Company Examples

Below you will find the assessment results of 12 major German companies. The companies' 2009 CO2 performance has been assessed against two different benchmarks; a) the 2009 CO2 performance of the German economy and b) the expected 2030 CO2 performance of the German economy based on the German political targets. Reporting quality of corporate sustainability reporting varies and there is a very low degree of standardisation. The reliability of our assessments depends on data quality. The column on the right of the table below reflects our assessments of the reporting quality for the purpose of our assessment. More information on the data quality issues in this context can be found by clicking on the name of the respective company.

  2009 2030  
Name Sustainable Value    RCR*      Sustainable Value  RCR    Reporting Quality   
BASF  € -51,215,375,510 1:4.5    € -183,066,612,244 1:13.3 gelb
BMW  € 10,684,467,921  3.9:1    € 3,441,897,081  1.3:1 gelb
Bayer  € -7,606,320,000  1:1.5    € -51,048,300,000  1:4.6 gelb
Daimler € 11,174,220,000  2.2:1    € -7,767,450,000  1:1.4 gelb
Deutsche Post € 391,600,000   1:1    € -34,652,000,000  1:2.9 gelb-rot
Deutsche Telekom  € 26,882,569,416  5.2:1    € 14,195,106,540  1.8:1 gelb
E.ON € -463,381,674,776  1:25.4    € -1,425,882,799,940 1:76.1 gelb
Metro € -1,345,076,060   1:1.2    € -19,231,782,650  1:3.5 gelb
RWE € -439,335,800,000 1:33.2   € -1,343,219,000,000 1:99.4 gelb-rot
Siemens € 24,442,484,736  3.7:1    € 6,650,679,840  1.3:1 gelb
ThyssenKrupp  € -52,656,133,968  1:6.8    € -175,797,568,020 1:20.4 gelb-rot
Volkswagen € 2,384,295,121   1.1:1    € -46,220,491,827  1:2.7 gelb

*RCR stands for Return to Cost Ratio. RCR describes how many times more (X : 1) or less (1 : X) eficient a company is compared to a benchmark. A company with a RCR of 2 : 1 uses CO2-emissions for example twice as efficiently as the benchmark. RCR is a relative measure that allows to compare companies independent of their size. Large companies can for example be expected to create bigger profits than smaller companies. This also holds true for Sustainable Value. Larger companies are likely to produce larger (positive or negative) Sustainable Value than smaller companies.